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How the Marijuana Industry is Changing

How the Marijuana Industry is Changing

Continued federal prohibition hasn't stopped the marijuana industry from growing like a very profitable weed. Despite what could be considered an unfriendly administration in Washington D.C., nine states and the District of Columbia now allow for recreational marijuana use and 30 allow for medical use. More states are lining up to join the legalization wave. Cannabis has become big business in the U.S.

The industry has been creating jobs and opportunities. There are 9,397 active licenses for marijuana businesses in the U.S. This includes cultivators, manufacturers, retailers, dispensaries, distributors, deliverers and test labs. The emerging industry took in nearly $9 billion in sales in 2017. With California having opened its massive retail market in January, the addition of the Golden State is huge for the industry. It is estimated that national marijuana sales will rise to $11 billion in 2018, and to $21 billion in 2021.

Cannabis jobs are multiplying as more states legalize recreational marijuana. California began sales of legalized adult-use cannabis on January 1, 2018. Customers lined up around the corners and one dispensary alone sold $30,000 worth of product by 1:30 in the afternoon on New Year’s Day, Marijuana Business Daily reports.

With so many dispensaries opening and the market sky rocketing, more jobs are becoming available. Dispensaries are looking for bud trimmers, bud tenders, extraction technicians, dispensary manages, edibles chiefs, gardeners/growers. The cannabis industry alone employees between 125,000 to 160,000 and is estimated to grow 21 percent per year.

We can keep this industry booming by getting all states on board and following the rules and regulations. The debate over cannabis is not diminishing. Even as more states allow cannabis sales, those who oppose marijuana now think they have their best chance ever of shutting it all down. However, the current administration has taken little to no action.